Nuremberg

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The 7 best things to do in Nuremberg

Once the seat of the Holy Roman Empire, center for Nazi rallies, and trials for their crimes, Nuremberg takes visitors on a tour that spans a millennium of history. Though devastated in WWII, the city rose from the rubble and meticulously rebuilt itself again.

  • Nuremberg Castle

    1. Nuremberg Castle

    Also known as the Kaiserburg, it took 400 years to build, and its 154-foot "Deep Well" still provides drinking water. The castle miraculously survived Allied bombings in 1945.

  • Albrecht Dürer's House

    2. Albrecht Dürer's House

    A visit to the home of the Renaissance draftsman, who made a name for himself by his early twenties, includes examples of his artistry in his painting and printing workshop.

  • St. Sebaldus Church

    3. St. Sebaldus Church

    It's the city's oldest church from the 13th century and takes its name from Nuremberg's patron saint, St. Sebald, whose bronze shrine in the parish took 11 years to complete.

  • St. Lorenz Church

    4. St. Lorenz Church

    The striking feature here is the stained glass rosetta window that measures 9.5 feet in diameter. Though bombed in WWII, the church kept its treasures in a bunker under the castle.

  • Nuremberg Zoo

    5. Nuremberg Zoo

    One of Europe's largest zoos, it houses the big cats, gorillas, a new dolphinarium, and manatee house. Don't miss the lions' feeding time daily at 2:30PM, except Mondays and Thursdays.

  • Germanisches Nationalmuseum

    6. Germanisches Nationalmuseum

    For a great lesson in German culture and history, this museum won't disappoint. The collection ranges from art to relics, and it also includes many of Dürer's priceless work.

  • Documentation Center Nazi Party Rally Grounds

    7. Documentation Center Nazi Party Rally Grounds

    The "Fascination and Terror" exhibit delves into the rise of the Nazis, their propaganda rallies, which took place on the grounds nearby, and the Nuremberg Trials after the war.

Planning Your Visit

  • How many days to spend in Nuremberg?

    Three full days will allow you to tour Nuremberg at a leisurely pace. Add an extra day if you're planning to visit the city's famous Christmas Market (Christkindlesmarkt) during the Holidays.

  • Getting around

    The city wall encompasses the historical center, and it's very easy and pleasant to walk from one attraction to the next. To reach the Document Center and Nazi Party Rally Grounds, take tram 4 to Duzendteich or tram 9 to Luidpoldhain, both of which pass through the city's main station (Hauptbahnhof). For a trip to the grounds, a day-ticket is the best bet. If you're visiting on a weekend, it's valid for that time.

  • Where to stay in Nuremberg

    Your best bet is to stay in the historical center and have everything at your finger tips. If your idea is to come for the Christmas market, then book a room well in advance, especially if you plan to be in Nuremburg over an Advent weekend.

Good to know

  • Language
    German
  • Currency
    Euro (€)
  • Time Zone
    UTC (+01:00)
  • Country Code
    +49
  • Best time to visit
    Spring and autumn are the best times to visit, when the temperatures are still pleasant, rainfall is lower, and crowds are fewer. The Christmas Markets are definitely worth the visit in December, but it will be cold, and there will be over a million people in the city.

Insider tips: Planning a trip to Nuremberg

Thomas Dowson is the founder of Archaeology Travel, a website for those seeking adventures in archaeology and history. As a professional archaeologist Thomas enjoys visiting archaeological and historical sites around the world. And sharing these experiences so that others can explore the world’s pasts more deeply. On his blog, you can find more information and all the details for planning a trip to Nuremberg.

What should I do on my first trip to Nuremberg?

Today the second largest city in Bavaria, Nuremberg has a complex but intriguing history. An Imperial City for the Holy Roman Empire and, partly because of this, a city chosen by the Nazis to hold their rallies. Visiting the Nuremberg Imperial Castle is a must. The oldest part dates to around 1000 AD, and together with the city walls, still standing in some places, this is considered one of the most formidable fortifications from medieval Europe. Away from the Altstadt, signs of the Nuremberg rallies also survive for those who are interested in 20th century history. The best way to see these is on a walking tour.

What are some hidden gems to see in Nuremberg?

My favourite Nuremberg ‘hidden gem’ is an object not an attraction. Although the object is in an amazing attraction, the Germanisches Nationalmuseum. This is the largest cultural and historical museum in the German-speaking region. In the vast collection of objects that range from prehistory to the present one stands out, the Behaim Globe made in the 1490s. It is the oldest spherical representation of the world in the world. The detail on the globe is exquisite, something any traveler will appreciate.

How much time should I spend in Nuremberg?

Nuremberg is a welcoming city throughout the year. But it is during December that most visitors come, for the world famous Christkindlesmarkt. While you could easily spend four or five days in the city during summer, a weekend break in December is more than enough time to experience Nuremberg at Christmas. Book yourself a good walking tour that includes the main sites, the markets and the history. Spend a few hours in the museum and then save time to explore the Christmas markets at your own pace. It will be a weekend you remember for all the right reasons.

What food is Nuremberg known for?

Nuremberg, and this part of Germany called Franconia, is known for a number of culinary delights. In spring it is spargelzeit and you can not miss the Franconian asparagus. In December, especially for Christmas, you can not avoid Nuremberg Lebkuchen; a traditional gingerbread with a closely guarded recipe that includes nuts, honey and a mix of different spices that include cinnamon, clove and cardamom. Throughout the year you will not be able to escape the Nuremberg Bratwurst. A few euros will get you three on a bread roll. If you are looking for something more substantial, try Schäufele. This is a typical regional dish, roasted shoulder of pork served with dumplings and red cabbage.

What is the best way to get around Nuremberg?

Everything most tourists want to see when they visit Nuremberg, particularly in the winter, is within walking distance. The old town is quite compact, and although the castle and the museum are at either ends of the town, they are only a 45 minute walk apart. The 20th century Nazi sites are a bit further away from the centre of town, but still within walking distance. Although the city has an excellent tram service.

What neighborhood should I stay in when I visit Nuremberg?

Given the atmosphere in the Old Town in December, I recommend finding a hotel in the centre. Really, there is no point in being too far away from the festive action! Being in the city centre allows you to get out early and beat the crowds if you need to. Nuremberg has a good range of hotels to choose from, to suit all styles and budgets.

What are the best annual events in Nuremberg?

Nuremberg’s Christmas market is one of the oldest and best known Christmas markets in the world. The oldest known date is 1628. In December each year over two million people visit Nuremberg. Known as Christkindlesmarkt, the market is opened by the Christkind on Friday evening before the first Sunday of Advent.

Other Sightseeing Options in Nuremberg

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What people are saying about Nuremberg

Overall rating

4.6 / 5

based on 785 reviews

There were only a couple and I leaving from Munich, which was excellent due to our current situation; in Nürnberg, three more people were waiting for the tour, which is also reasonable. The guide showed us the history of the places, curiosities, and even gave some tips about the city. I would recommend the tour, and the town is lovely; I felt like I was in a medieval movie.

The tour with Heinz was fantastic. A great overview and historical background of the Old City. He was very knowledgable and was happy to answer any questions. It was a fabulous introduction to Nurnberg!

Jason contacted us immediately about the meeting point. He asked if we had any special requests on the way. He was funny and had a great personality which fit my family perfectly.

Sehr tolle Führung, mit kompetentem und sehr nettem Guide, der viel über Nürnberg und die Geschichte erzählt hat.

Sehr schöne private Tour durch Nürnberg, mit einer sehr kompetenten, netten und lustigen Führung.